version: UK | USA | International


Who will I be when I die?

Who will I be when I die?

Christine Bryden
Foreword by Elizabeth MacKinlay

Paperback: £13.99 / $19.95

2012, 216mm x 138mm / 8.5in x 5.5in, 176pp
ISBN: 978-1-84905-312-9, BIC 2: JKSG VFJG MQCL4

add to cart
  • description |
  • reviews |
  • contents |

Christine Bryden was 46 years old when she was diagnosed with dementia, and in this book she describes her remarkable emotional, physical and spiritual journey in the three years immediately following. Offering rare first-hand insights into how it feels to gradually lose the ability to undertake tasks most people take for granted, it is made all the more remarkable by Christine's positivity and strength, and deep sense, drawn in part from her Christian faith, that life continues to have purpose and meaning.
 
Originally published in Australia in 1998, the book is brought up-to-date with a new Foreword, Preface and Appendix, in which Christine explains how the disease has progressed over the years, and how she is today. It also contains many previously unseen photographs of Christine and her family, from around the time of her diagnosis up to the present day.

Inspirational and informative in equal measure, Who will I be when I die? will be of interest to other people with dementia and their families, as well as to dementia care professionals.

Blog posts

Request a free copy of JKP’s latest catalogue on dementia

30 April 2013

Our latest catalogue on Dementia and Elder Care is now available. With full information on our new and bestselling titles, this catalogue is a tremendous resource not only for those working with people affected by dementia, but also for family members, friends and anyone who works with the elderly. The catalogue includes practical books for...

VIDEO: An insider’s perspective on what you can do to help a person with dementia – with JKP author Christine Bryden

9 March 2012

"I think it's really important to stay in communication with us, as human being to human being – because we are still human beings with a spirit. And it's spirit to spirit that we can really stay in touch."

Living with Dementia: A journey to the inner self – An Interview with Christine Bryden

15 February 2012

"When I first started, there was no support for people with dementia, as it was assumed we lacked insight. Indeed the words of an Annual Report in 2000 of an Alzheimer’s Association spoke of us as being "mindless empty shells". At first when I spoke up, people did not believe I had dementia because I could still speak. They said that even if I was showing the early signs, I was not a credible representative of people with dementia because of my level of function. Yet since then I have met so many others who have this diagnosis who are speaking out... We are receiving so much support and encouragement, and we are being listened to and respected. By treating us as experts in what it feels like to have a diagnosis of dementia, services and support are being much improved."

By the same author

Cover of Dancing with Dementia

Dancing with Dementia

My Story of Living Positively with Dementia

Christine Bryden